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Archive for the ‘on the coast’ Category

Each year a poetry festival takes place in Wells-next-the-Sea. 2009 will be the 12th year of the event.

Poets of all ages can take part in competitions and readings.

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Poetry workshops as well as readings by reputated poets are on offer, accompanied by concerts and art exhibitions.

Wells itself is a charming coastal resort on the North Norfolk coast. So, come and take part to discover your hidden talents!

sunset-wells1 Wells, sunset

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Alison’s art is amazingly imaginative and colourful. She lives near the North Norfolk coast.

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Super Catnap

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The red bird

Artist Statement
“My prints are produced on a hand-operated press in the garden studio and are made in small editions. I then use watercolour and sometimes gold leaf to add richness. I also paint in the same studio (when there is space among the printmaking paraphernalia!)

I like creating guardians for home or work place. I find people are pleased with the idea of a benign, protecting presence. I have been commissioned to produce ‘angels’ for private houses, a sheep farm, a church, a village hall and even a yacht in Greece! The Eastern Daily Press featured my ‘house angel’ on the cover of the 2003 Open Studios brochure.

The inspiration for my pictures comes from stories and poems, angels and lovers, mermaids and myths – though I began with angels – hence the name of ‘angel art’ for my website.

I have recently been enjoying working with ‘creative partnerships’, an organisation for promoting creativity in schools through making connections between artists and young people. I also teach printmaking and welcome commissions from anybody with an interest in my work.”

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Heavens Cloth

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Naming the Birds

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North Garden

Garden Arches

East Ruston hosts one of the most amazing gardens in the whole country: East Ruston Old Vicarage Gardens. Created by Alan Gray and Graham Robeson, now 15 years old and expanding at a rate of knots, it is a feast of formal design, and decorative exuberance.


flowerfield

It is located quite close to the sea and well protected from the full blast of the wind by dense wind breaks, making it possible to grow remarkably tender plants. Clustering about the Arts and Crafts Vicarage, walled and hedged compartments vary strongly in mood from cool formality to explosions of colour and form. Sculptures, lavishly planted pots and finely detailed walls and gates also play their decorative part.


Pagoda


Wildlife pond with scuplture


Summerhouse

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Beans Boat Trips offer great Seal trips starting at Blakeney, on the North Norfolk coast.

“Why not join us on one of our daily boat trips when you visit North Norfolk and see the SEALS & BIRDS in their natural environment at BLAKENEY POINT. Beans Seal Trips have been a family run business for over 50 years and are a very popular and safe way to enjoy a close up view of the wildlife – without disturbing it. We run every day throughout the season (1st April until 31st October) as well as regularly throughout the winter.

After a short boat ride we arrive at the seals. They are usually basking on the sandbanks at the far end of Blakeney Point. We guarantee you will always see some seals – the question is: How Many?? The colony is made up of Common & Grey seals and numbers around 500. Common seals have their young between June and August, the Greys between November and January. Both suckle their pups for about three weeks during which time they grow very quickly, putting on between 1kg and 1.6kgs a day due to the very rich and fatty milk they feed on.

The seals are generally quite inquisitive and often pop up and swim around the boats for a look at us!
Seals generally spend up to 90% of their lives out of the water basking on the sandbanks. The females usually outlive the males: 35 years is about the maximum for them and 25 years for the males. Although very clumsy and cumbersome on land, once in the water, seals can be very agile, reaching speeds of up to 20mph. They can also submerge for up to 30 minutes if necessary and in certain waters have been recorded diving to a depth of 600ft (300 metres). Generally though, it’s a quick 3 – 5 minute dive for fish which the seals locate in the water not only by sight but also by feeling vibrations through their whiskers. Seals tend to feed out at sea although some of their favourites – flounders, white bait and sand eels – are often found in the Harbour. An average size seal can often take up to 10lb (22kgs) of fish in a day.”

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For more than 100 years, Cromer has been one of Norfolk’s most popular seaside resorts. Today, it combines the charme of the past with bustling streets, galleries, pubs and small restaurants.

Cromer Crabs, a well known delicacy:
“Crab are a large part of the income of the town of Cromer. Historically the crab were only caught in the summer months, in autumn the fishermen brought Herring to the town, and winter cod was the main catch. This has now changed to solely bringing crab and lobster to the town.
The Cromer Crab in particular are known for their tender flesh, and high proportion of white meat to dark. The fleet has reduced to about a dozen boats, looking after about 200 crab pots, meaning that it is even more of a specialty!
Cromer Crab can be eaten on their own and are a great ingredient in Crab Recipes.”

“With its pier and its two museums, wide open beaches, spectacular cliffs, its famous pier show, its cinema with three screens, there’s lots to enjoy in Cromer. The streets of Cromer today are little removed from how they looked in the Victorian era. Most of the great landmarks, many of which were created by the well-to-do Victorian “summer timers”, still stand as familiar to the holiday makers of today as they were to their counterparts a hundred years ago.

Cromer does however have a much more ancient history than that, the magnificent church is a medieval legacy, a relic from the days when Cromer was still known as Shipden – a modest settlement of fishermen and merchants.” (Cromer website)

“By the 1890s Cromer was fashionable and booming. Many fine residences were built and the Urban District Council saw that the infrastructure – drainage, roads, schools, electricity and so on – was the best. In 1900 a new pier were erected and the promenade, first built sixty-five years before, was lengthened and enhanced. The suburban development of the 20th century, particularly of the post-war period has seen the town expand in every direction.

The Town’s reputation for crab fishing is undiminished. You can still watch the crab boats arrive every morning with their catch. There are several small fish shops in town where you can buy one of the day’s catch and virtually every eating place will have a crab dish on the menu.” (Cromer website)

Cromer Pier at night

“June in Cromer”, by Gena Ivanov

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