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Posts Tagged ‘north norfolk’

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The village of Knapton had its summer festival “Knapton Together” at the weekend of 4 and 5 July.

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Open Gardens and Studios, a Flower Festival in the church, a display of vintage vehicles, Crafts and Gifts Fair and glorious sunshine attracted lots of visitors.

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Saint Peter and Saint Paul Parish Church

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The present church dates from mainly the 14th century and is famous for its carved angels. The promenant feature of this church is the roof,  a double hammerbeam. The beams and spandrels are richly carved with three tiers of angels which have outspread wings. More angels are carved on the kingposts and on the wall plate.

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The theme of the Flower Festival was “Weddings”. This photo shows a flower arrangement by Mundesley Village Flower Shoppe.

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Some of the gardens were absolutely stunning, and all highly individual.

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And who would expect Stonehenge or the stone circles of Avebury in Knapton?…

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happy-gardener

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The venue is fascinating and spectacular in itself:  Salthouse Church St Nicholas proudly overlooks the sea.

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Situated between Weybourne and Cley on the North Norfolk coast, the church also hosts one of the major yearly Norfolk art events, the North Norfolk Exhibition Project (NNEP).

Memoria RoubadaII by A Pacheco
Memoria RoubadaII by A Pacheco
“Since its very first exhibition, the (voluntary) North Norfolk Exhibition Project (NNEP) has annually staged a curated month-long contemporary art exhibition in the beautiful setting of Salthouse Church.
Each year, those selected artists with a Norfolk connection have produced thought-provoking, exciting work; often inspired by and reflecting the local built and natural environment. In the absence of a dedicated non-commercial gallery in North Norfolk, the Project plays an invaluable role in promoting contemporary visual art. The NNEP exhibitions are recognised as one of the County’s premier arts events.” (source: see website)

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The historic village of Trunch, North Norfolk, lies two miles off the coast. Its next seaside resort is Mundesley.

Trunch has now its own website with its own Trunch blog, informing about events in and around Trunch. Sounds boring? Well, have a look!

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Each year a poetry festival takes place in Wells-next-the-Sea. 2009 will be the 12th year of the event.

Poets of all ages can take part in competitions and readings.

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Poetry workshops as well as readings by reputated poets are on offer, accompanied by concerts and art exhibitions.

Wells itself is a charming coastal resort on the North Norfolk coast. So, come and take part to discover your hidden talents!

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Alison’s art is amazingly imaginative and colourful. She lives near the North Norfolk coast.

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Super Catnap

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The red bird

Artist Statement
“My prints are produced on a hand-operated press in the garden studio and are made in small editions. I then use watercolour and sometimes gold leaf to add richness. I also paint in the same studio (when there is space among the printmaking paraphernalia!)

I like creating guardians for home or work place. I find people are pleased with the idea of a benign, protecting presence. I have been commissioned to produce ‘angels’ for private houses, a sheep farm, a church, a village hall and even a yacht in Greece! The Eastern Daily Press featured my ‘house angel’ on the cover of the 2003 Open Studios brochure.

The inspiration for my pictures comes from stories and poems, angels and lovers, mermaids and myths – though I began with angels – hence the name of ‘angel art’ for my website.

I have recently been enjoying working with ‘creative partnerships’, an organisation for promoting creativity in schools through making connections between artists and young people. I also teach printmaking and welcome commissions from anybody with an interest in my work.”

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Heavens Cloth

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Naming the Birds

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“Agapanthus”, by Angie Lewin

Angie Lewin does wonderful and inspiring printed work in linocut, wood engraving and collage. She lives in North Norfolk, and her work is shown in many galleries nationwide.


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Winter Spey III

Angie says about herself:

“I studied Ba(Hons) Fine Art Printmaking at Central St. Martins College of Art and Design between 1983 and 1986, followed by a year’s part-time postgraduate printmaking at Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts.

I have worked in a range of printmaking techniques including lithography, silkscreen and etching. More recently I have concentrated on lino and woodcut and wood engraving.

In 2006 I was elected to The Royal Society of Painter Printmakers and in 2008 to The Society of Wood Engravers.”

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Beans Boat Trips offer great Seal trips starting at Blakeney, on the North Norfolk coast.

“Why not join us on one of our daily boat trips when you visit North Norfolk and see the SEALS & BIRDS in their natural environment at BLAKENEY POINT. Beans Seal Trips have been a family run business for over 50 years and are a very popular and safe way to enjoy a close up view of the wildlife – without disturbing it. We run every day throughout the season (1st April until 31st October) as well as regularly throughout the winter.

After a short boat ride we arrive at the seals. They are usually basking on the sandbanks at the far end of Blakeney Point. We guarantee you will always see some seals – the question is: How Many?? The colony is made up of Common & Grey seals and numbers around 500. Common seals have their young between June and August, the Greys between November and January. Both suckle their pups for about three weeks during which time they grow very quickly, putting on between 1kg and 1.6kgs a day due to the very rich and fatty milk they feed on.

The seals are generally quite inquisitive and often pop up and swim around the boats for a look at us!
Seals generally spend up to 90% of their lives out of the water basking on the sandbanks. The females usually outlive the males: 35 years is about the maximum for them and 25 years for the males. Although very clumsy and cumbersome on land, once in the water, seals can be very agile, reaching speeds of up to 20mph. They can also submerge for up to 30 minutes if necessary and in certain waters have been recorded diving to a depth of 600ft (300 metres). Generally though, it’s a quick 3 – 5 minute dive for fish which the seals locate in the water not only by sight but also by feeling vibrations through their whiskers. Seals tend to feed out at sea although some of their favourites – flounders, white bait and sand eels – are often found in the Harbour. An average size seal can often take up to 10lb (22kgs) of fish in a day.”

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